10 simple but useful Ableton Live tips #2

Here is part 2 of the super simple but useful Live Tips.

 

As well as using Time Commands in the main Arrangement view, you can use them in the MIDI Editor too! This is really handy for cutting out/adding in chunks of MIDI notes while preserving everything surrounding them.
Need to free up lots of CPU? Select multiple Tracks, right click and choose “Freeze Track”, then go make a cup of tea. Live will Freeze each individual Track down into audio, removing the need to process any effects or instruments (don’t worry, you can always right click and unfreeze the track to go back to the original when you need to edit again).
To give each one of your Chains an equal amount in the Chain Selector, drag each chains Zone out so it ranges 0-127, then right click and choose “Distribute Ranges Equally”.
Turning on the MIDI Editor Preview also turns on a very easy to use step sequencer. Just push whatever note(s) you want on your MIDI keyboard (or virtual MIDI keyboard) and use the left and right arrow keys. If a note is held, when the key is pushed, it will insert a note.
Holding down the command key lets you drag slopes that change the velocity of each note selected in the MIDI Editor.
You can Freeze a track, duplicate it to a new audio Track by option + dragging, then unfreeze the original. This is really hand for doing a quick resample, just remember you can’t freeze a track if any of its effects have an active sidechain input!
In Arrangement view, holding option + command and will let you scroll/pan left and right when you click anywhere in the Arrangement.
If you are multi-track recording in Session view, make sure “Start Recording on Scene Launch” is selected in the Preferences (under Record / Warp / Launch). That way you just have to arm the right tracks and trigger a scene to start recording clips in all tracks.
You’re not restricted to grouping tracks that are next to each other. Instead of shift, hold down the command key and click on the tracks you want, then push command + g. All the tracks will be put into a neat group for you.
A few little extra assignable goodies pop up when you enter key/midi map mode (command + k and command + r). Turn the map modes on and look around, you can assign external events to move up and down Scenes, trigger the selected Scene, or even trigger the selected Clip in that Track.
 
  1. As well as using Time Commands in the main Arrangement view, you can use them in the MIDI Editor too! This is really handy for cutting out/adding in chunks of MIDI notes while preserving everything surrounding them.
  2. Need to free up lots of CPU? Select multiple Tracks, right click and choose “Freeze Track”, then go make a cup of tea. Live will Freeze each individual Track down into audio, removing the need to process any effects or instruments (don’t worry, you can always right click and unfreeze the track to go back to the original when you need to edit again).
  3. To give each one of your Chains an equal amount in the Chain Selector, drag each chains Zone out so it ranges 0-127, then right click and choose “Distribute Ranges Equally”.
  4. Turning on the MIDI Editor Preview also turns on a very easy to use step sequencer. Just push whatever note(s) you want on your MIDI keyboard (or virtual MIDI keyboard) and use the left and right arrow keys. If a note is held, when the key is pushed, it will insert a note.
  5. Holding down the command key lets you drag slopes that change the velocity of each note selected in the MIDI Editor.
  6. You can Freeze a track, duplicate it to a new audio Track by option + dragging, then unfreeze the original. This is really hand for doing a quick resample, just remember you can’t freeze a track if any of its effects have an active sidechain input!
  7. In Arrangement view, holding option + command and will let you scroll/pan left and right when you click anywhere in the Arrangement.
  8. If you are multi-track recording in Session view, make sure “Start Recording on Scene Launch” is selected in the Preferences (under Record / Warp / Launch). That way you just have to arm the right tracks and trigger a scene to start recording clips in all tracks.
  9. You’re not restricted to grouping tracks that are next to each other. Instead of shift, hold down the command key and click on the tracks you want, then push command + g. All the tracks will be put into a neat group for you.
  10. A few little extra assignable goodies pop up when you enter key/midi map mode (command + k and command + r). Turn the map modes on and look around, you can assign external events to move up and down Scenes, trigger the selected Scene, or even trigger the selected Clip in that Track.

 

About The Author
Tom Cosm
Author: Tom Cosm

Tom Cosm is an Ableton Certified Trainer and live electronic music performer from New Zealand. You can find him on G+, Twitter and Facebook.